Connect Blog | WhyHunger

This post first appeared in The Huffington Post.

“No problem can be solved on the same level of consciousness that created it.” - Albert Einstein

Our current governmental situation is unlike any we have faced as a nation throughout our history. It is not a problem of liberal against conservative, Republican against Democrat, red against blue, white against color or cities against rural and suburbs, although it has all of those elements.

It is a problem of power, whether power means dominance or service, narcissism that says “only I can do it, only I can save you” or the power of humility that says we are stronger together and we all have something to contribute.

It is a problem of truthfulness, whether words and real facts actually matter, actually mean something rather than emerging and then disappearing into some alternate pseudo reality.

It is a problem of reality itself, what is real as opposed to what is merely framed as real. How can real problems be identified and then solved when they are clouded by a series of lies, false denials and twisted statements that are tossed into a narrative that purports to be truthful, and may contain fragments of truth, but is fraudulent?

It is a problem of fear, fear of the illusion of national carnage, that it might creep into my neighborhood, harm my children and threaten my home. Fear of the “other” who look or pray or dress differently. It is a fear that can paralyze people who would normally know better but who vote for and support politicians who do not have their best interests at heart and, in fact, pass laws and promote policies that harm these same voters.

It is the problem of promises of better health care for all when there is no real plan, only a series of cuts that will throw millions of people off Medicaid, promising to leave successful programs like Social Security and Medicare alone while allies have their own plans to severely cut the same programs and many more that serve millions of poor and middle class citizens.

It is a problem of the emerging of the old “America First” isolationist mentality that shut the doors to millions of European Jews for more than ten years during the Holocaust when open doors could have saved many lives. It is a policy that goes against the best in our tradition of international involvement in world affairs and locks the doors of entry for millions of those who are peaceful seekers of the American Dream but who may look or speak or pray differently.

It is a problem for millions of folks who have lived in America for years, worked hard and paid taxes and will now face possible deportation which in many cases will divide parents from their children.

It is a problem for millions of farm workers who pick our fruits and vegetables, for farmers who depend on them and for all of us who depend on their labor.

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Just in time for International Women’s Day, WhyHunger is excited to release our newest publication “Through Her Eyes: The Struggle for Food Sovereignty.” International Women’s Day is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. We know that women are responsible for 60-80% of food production in the Global South and represent 50% of food chain workers in the U.S. Yet, women and girls are disproportionally affected by hunger. And for us, it is very important to recognize and honor the women around the world who are fighting for food sovereignty and creating just, sustainable communities that benefit all. In Through Her Eyes, women from all over share their opinions and experiences on topics including agrochemicals, fishing practices, food stamps, GMOs, farmworkers and more.

Excerpt:

It is imperative; therefore, that women’s voices are at the center of the debate about how to dismantle the current food regime and replace it with food sovereignty and agroecology. Though not yet mainstream concepts or practices, the work of grassroots organizations is beginning to result in a scaling out of agroecology in both rural and urban areas. This publication aims to highlight the leadership of women in making that possible.
Through excerpts of interviews and dialogue with women organizers and food producers from the United States and globally in response to the question “what are the impacts of industrial food and farming on women and how are women organizing to build an alternative,” this publication amplifies the voices of women who are on the frontlines in the ongoing struggle for land, water, localized economies, and a world free of violence and hunger.

It emerges in a moment when arguably a new world order is beginning to take shape. In the face of economic and social systems in crisis and deepening inequality the world over, the struggle for food sovereignty, agroecology and climate justice is a struggle for more than just the right to food. It is a struggle for a new world order that centers the rights of women to live freely and safely, and to lead in envisioning and crafting a world void of hunger and violence. WhyHunger is committed to standing in solidarity with women whose lived experiences are forging the path to food sovereignty.

We invite you to read, download and share this publication to learn more about the issues affecting our food system and the women who are creating solutions to achieve food sovereignty.

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Welcome to WhyHunger’s Connect Blog featuring stories, projects and articles from the community-based organizations, organizers and social movements that are building the movement for food justice.

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