We are excited to continue our powerful Food Justice Voices series in 2017 beginning with El Sueño Americano – The American Dream. Food Justice Voices is intended to amplify the voices and experiences of grassroots leaders that aren’t heard enough, while creating awareness and educating readers on various issues connected to hunger and poverty. El Sueño Americano is no different. In this piece, you’ll hear directly from Kathia Ramirez, organizer and Food Justice Coordinator at CATA (The Farmworker Support Committee/Comité de Apoyo a los Trabajadores Agrícolas) in New Jersey, along with farmworker members of CATA. Kathia is from Los Angeles, CA although her parents migrated from the State of Oaxaca, Mexico where they have a history of working the land. In this piece, Kathia discusses the immigrant farmworker experience in pursuing the American dream, the struggles they face and why the work for food justice is important on many levels.

“Here in the United States, food is produced more as quantity over quality. It is not about whether it is nutritious but rather if it looks "good" on the outside even though it might be tasteless or have been forced to grow in a short period of time. Our food system is dependent on pesticides and paying workers a low wage in order meet the demand for cheap food. This creates a vicious cycle because farmworkers are only able to afford cheap, processed food with little access to healthy, organic produce.” – Kathia Ramirez

Read, download and share this article today!

At a national gathering I participated in with 500 community organizations and food access groups like soup kitchens, food banks, and food pantries a bold, collective statement emerged from the people working on the frontlines of hunger.  I look to their experience as a grounding force in our evolving strategies to end hunger. They stated:  "Racial injustice and privilege are at the root of economic injustice. Economic injustice is the root cause of hunger. The only way to end hunger is to end racial injustice." This analysis emanates from communities gripped by the harsh realities of hunger and poverty.  When I stand side by side with community leaders experiencing their work firsthand and talking with people who participate in their programs, I believe this to be true and bear witness.  When Harry Chapin and Bill Ayres founded our organization so many years ago they knew that hunger was a symptom of poverty and social injustice including racism.  Today we carry that work forward informed by our partners and inspired by our founders.

Here at WhyHunger, we are deeply troubled by the escalating violence in America and around the world. We need deep reflection and positive action. Now is the time to put in motion the healing we still must undertake to address the historical roots of racism perpetuated by the systems, institutions, and policies that are its legacy and keep us from reaching our full human potential. We must end violence in all forms if we are to create a peaceful future and one that is free from hunger and poverty. We have to ask ourselves why people of color are disproportionately living with hunger and poverty and why their communities remain under-resourced and marginalized. Racial inequity and hunger are deeply connected and addressing these disparities is critical to building a better future for all Americans. We are not free until all are free; we are not healthy until all are nourished.
 
With support, dedication and an unwavering commitment to social justice, WhyHunger knows we have a critical and unique role to play. We work in partnership with communities of color who are working to achieve land access and ownership to grow and produce bountiful food. You can see some of that work in our "What Ferguson Means for the Food Justice Movement" series, in which Black leaders discuss and analyze the ways in which Black communities are oppressed by our current food system, and solutions led by those communities are lifted up. Together, with thousands of diverse grassroots partners around the world, we are transforming our food system so that it is economically just, environmentally sound and addresses oppression at home and abroad. This journey is long and hard, yet indispensable to a peaceful future. We cannot do it alone. We need the leadership of people most affected by the injustices of poverty, along with grassroots organizations and champions of our work, like you. The change we seek is possible and that more peaceful future is ours to create.

Our longtime friend and Board Member Joe D'Urso's 3rd annual Rockland-Bergen Music Festival is coming up on June 25-26, so I interviewed him to learn more about the festival and what motivates him to organize and include a cause-related element at his festival.
 
Why is it important for you to host an event such as The Rockland-Bergen Music Festival? 
 
It’s a mixture of a few things. I’ve lived basically my whole life in that area, on the borders of those two counties. As a kid I grew up in Rockland, and the end of my street was Bergen. As an adult I live in Bergen, and the end of my street is basically Rockland. Even musically to me, when I think of New Jersey I think of the sounds of the Jersey Shore, as well as Frank Sinatra. When I think of New York music, I think of the punk scene that came out of New York, as well as the folk scene that came out in the early 60’s. Musically, it all makes sense to me. I’ve always wanted to put together a music festival that combines my two passions: one being music, and two being able to bring in different organizations that I work with, and have concern for, and put them all together. This way the music fans discover some of those organizations, and support them. It is something that is fairly unusual; other festivals will have a couple of organizations or events, where they’ll raise money for one organization, maybe two. This year we will have 15 nonprofits onsite. My idea behind it is that between those 15 organizations that may grow to 20 25 next year, people attending that festival will hopefully find one organization that they are drawn to. Where hunger and poverty might be something of concern to you and I, it may not be for another person. Not that they don’t care, but they may be drawn to other causes like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, or The Make a Wish Foundation. I just think that having peopled drawn to something relevant to them, makes them more active and caring, which is a good idea. I am fortunate that we have, what we’re calling Active’s Circle of Hope this year.  I have a great organization called Active International that will be donating money to each one of the organizations that I have invited. In the first two years, there was just a donation from me, but by having a bigger company involved now, it means a more sizable donation on top of whatever each organization raises each day.
 
 How has being a WhyHunger Board Member impacted you or your music? 
 
I have been a board member for about 5 years now, and have been with WhyHunger for about 15 years before I joined the board. I don’t just look at it from a board member’s perspective, but as an active member of WhyHunger for almost 20 years. I think that it’s helped me as a songwriter, and as a person just to be reminded that there are other people around us in need. I think that there are people out there that you can tell that to 100 times, and they are still not going to do anything for whatever reason. One of the things that we try to do as board members, and as musicians, is to remain hopeful that maybe on the 101st try, those people may change their mind. It takes a lot of perseverance, and what some might even call foolish persistence, but I use that in the most positive way, not a negative.
 
In what way does music and social justice connect?
 
For me personally, music and social justice connects without a doubt. I’ve always been a fan of people like Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, and those types of songwriters who could have fun songs, but many of their songs were also talking about something bigger than themselves, or the fun night they were about to have; it was about society. I think it’s hard just to be of a somewhat relative intelligence, and not look around and be able to see what you feel is morally wrong and right in society. Now, not everyone is going to agree with you, and you may not always be right, but I think that if you feel passionate about something and at least it stirs some emotions, then hopefully, something comes out of that. In that way, it all ties in together.
 
What can people look forward to at the festival? 
 
Well first and foremost, I have 22 very talented bands and artists over the two days. It’s a very unique setting because it’s set in a woodsy, laid back park. It’s different from many other areas found at bigger festivals and it’s a very relaxed setting. We’ll have great food, great beverages, and as someone had said, which is probably the best quote I read last year or two years ago, is that ‘It’s like being at a family BBQ, but with famous people.’ That is exactly the kind of feeling I want. I don’t allow any VIP sections. I’ve never been a fan of someone’s wallet determining who the better music fan is. I realize that is part of the music business, but I’ve made it not part of my festival. So I try and keep it very calm, and have everyone on the same playing field.
 
Most popular food item at the festival? 
 
One of my main food vendors is called Bailey’s SmokeHouse and they have the best pull pork sandwiches around. They also have the typical burgers, hot dogs, chicken, black bean burgers and it’s just lots of great food. They are one of the most famous restaurants in the area and they serve about 4,000 people a week, something crazy like that. I also have a company called Growler and Gil, who will be pouring 6-8 different craft beers. This year, for the first time, I’ll be bringing in a company that specializes in vegan, vegetarian, and gluten free options. I am trying to make sure that everyone is taken care of!
 
Anything else you’d like to add?
 
There are two stages at my festival, the first one is called the Glow-Seeger Stage. Glow after my mom and Seeger after Pete Seeger. The second stage is named after two friends of mine that recently passed away, Mr. Lou/Stefan’s Turning Point Stage. Lou was the bass player in my band for many, many years, and Stefan was in charge of The Turning Point, a venue that has hosted me many times. I had a tough decision while naming the stages because of my involvement with WhyHunger and Harry Chapin, because I wanted to get a Harry name in there as well, but since Pete has recently passed away, I felt that out of respect to Pete, I should include his name in there. 
 
I want folks to know that I’ve really try to personalize everything and that we have truly grown. We have tripled our sponsorship this year, which is a great thing, even while staying true to our values. One sponsors asked me if they can have their people’s chairs set up upfront, and I said no, even knowing that they could withdraw their sponsorship, but what I try to do is offer something different like food and beverage vouchers for their guests because as I mentioned before, I don’t want to separate people and create divides. It is very important to me to keep that family vibe.
 
A special thanks to Joe for taking the time to tell me about his event which unites several great nonprofit organizations like Whyhunger! For more information on the festival visit //www.rocklandmusicfestival.com/ and to buy tickets click here.
Be sure to follow them on Twitter! 
 

WhyHunger’s What Ferguson Means for the Food Justice Movement series is a bold attempt to explore the way in which police violence and institutionalized anti-black racism is deeply interconnected to food, land and Black bodies. What is the connection between the death of Black people at the hands of the state (police shootings) and the death of Black people at the hands of the corporate food system (diet-related disease/land displacement/redlining)?

To lift up critical voices of the movement, WhyHunger’s Beatriz Beckford facilitated a national call with dynamic organizers and activists across the country to gather a collective interrogation of these issues from the perspective of Black activists organizing around food justice. Issue #5 features food justice activist Tanya Fields, who is the Founder and Executive Director of The BLK ProjeK, an economic development enterprise that utilizes the good food movement to provide opportunities for marginalized women and youth of color in the Bronx. In this piece Tanya gives her perspective as a mother, and emphasizes that “radical mothering” and being unapologetic in working to build a community (safety, healthy food, quality education) that your child deserves and can thrive in, will create a more just system for all.

Excerpt:

Beatriz Beckford: Black womyn and more specifically Black mothers and families have always been involved in movements and, I would argue, the love of kin and the pursuit of a better quality of life for our loved ones is what often times pushes mothers and families into movement work. How does being a Black womyn and a mother in the food movement create both barriers and opportunities for participating in and leading social change efforts?

Tanya Fields: You make the road by walking. When other moms, particularly low income Black mothers have seen Black women in this space as leaders, the reception is that people feel very inspired and motivated. If this mom with her whole gang of children can do this, in the spirit of creating a better world for our kids and everyone, it plants the seed for everyone else. When you step into motherhood, you don’t stop being a woman but your focus changes. Most mothers will tell you that they put her children’s needs before their own so it would be natural that mothers would want to be an integral part of social change. We want to clothe our children, feed our children and provide our children with the means to live a good life. We strive to enrich their quality of life. That’s why I always say that mothers have to be on the frontlines in movement work because we are creating a world that’s going to be safe and healthy and whole for our children and loved ones.

Download and continue reading the full issue. Also, join this important conversation online using hashtag #FoodJusticeVoices to share your thoughts!

This is the first article of the series “People’s Agroecology,” written by Blain Snipstal, a returning generation farmer part of the Black Dirt Farm Collective in Maryland. As part of the continuation of the 2015 Campesino a Campesino Agroecology Encounter led by farmworkers in the US, Blain visited four leading organizations in the US and Puerto Rico in this effort to learn more about challenges and current practices to advance their goals through Agroecology.

The place of Agroecology

As people in struggle, our causes, and our organized efforts do not exist in a vacuum. They are efforts that, taken into the historic contexts in which they appear, are created by and/or in response to the conditions of their time. It is within this vein that the articulation of agroecology in the US should be located, and as part of the 500 year (plus) process of struggle and resistance.

It is also critically important to situate agroecology as a tool for social struggle – that is, to use it to fundamentally change the relations of power in the food system and as way for healing of our Mother Earth, at local and national levels. It is not just a mere form of “Sustainable Agriculture”. To be clear, it is not about situating one word against another like permaculture versus agroecology, or sustainable agriculture versus biodynamic – to do so would limit the narrative to its ecological boundaries. It is about a series of ecological principles and values, the revalorization of local/traditional/indigenous knowledge, bringing dignity and vibrant livelihoods back to rural life and food systems labor, and a clear alternative to the industrial model of agriculture. Agroecology is a political and social methodology and process, as much as it is an ecological alternative to Agribusiness. This clarity is especially important given the current efforts by NGO’s, community based organizations and social movement organizations that are raising the banner of agroecology in the United States.

Why Agroecology? Who is advancing and using agroecology in the US? Why situate political training and leadership development while developing agroecological systems? These are some of the questions to explore and discuss throughout this series.

Starting from the bottom

The industrial food system as we know it today is the child of the plantation system of agriculture. They are both built upon exploited labor, dispossession and exploitation of land from indigenous peoples, the destruction of rural culture and land, consolidation of power and land in the ruling classes, and the forced migration of peoples. The plantation system was the first major system used by the colonial forces in their violent transformation of the Earth into land, people into property, and nature into a commodity – all to be sold on the “fair” market. This transformation was long, crafted and violent, and supported by the state. Land was stolen from the Indigenous and people were stolen from Africa. Race and White Supremacy were then created to give the cultural and psychological basis to support the rationale, organization and logic of capital. The church was implicated in deepening the rationale of slavery. Violence against women and gender-based violence further drove the normalization of servitude home. This was all woven into the fabric of the plantation system of agriculture in the South, during its development from the 16th to the 19th centuries.

Indentured Irish were the first toilers, then enslaved Africans for over 250 years. During the expansion out west, the Western Indigenous groups were violently used in the creation of the wine and food production systems. Back in the South, there was steady flow of poor black and white labor used throughout the food system up until WWII, when the Bracero Program was implemented throughout the United States that brought Mexican farmers and peoples into the U.S. as Farmworkers. But the Bracero program was “formalized” after an already over half-century of farm work provided by Mexicans. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw farm labor represented by Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino peoples (National Farm Worker Ministry). After WWII, as US capital interest and colonial forces spread out around the world, spreading the gift of democracy and “freedom”, you then find those places of “interest” represented in the labor of the food system – Mexicans (and Central American folk in general), Jamaicans, Haitians, Indians, Hmong, and the list goes on. It was like a revolving door of sorts - and it is still the case today.

blainpiece 2

 The two critical pieces within the development of the industrial food system have been – and will continue to be – land and labor. And within the context of land and labor within US agrarian history we can say that, the particular dispossession and colonization of indigenous peoples’ land and then the subsequent dispossession of Black-owned land in the 20th century, consistent discrimination and violence towards people of color and migrants in the food system, the dwindling population of small-to-medium scale farms, and the historically persistent exploitative use of people of color as farmworkers is important to name.

So why does any of this matter when talking about Agroecology in the United States?

Agroecology, and those that use it as a banner of struggle, must find its place in stark contrast to this violent narrative of the capitalist industrial model of agriculture and its development in the US. Having an historical analysis about how this model of agriculture and its food system came to be, is critical. This inquiry allows us to understand that the critical and historic nature of farmworkers, black and brown farmers, indigenous peoples and food system workers must be at the center of the movement for agroecology and food sovereignty in the United States.

This is not to say those who are not represented by either of those aforementioned groups do not have an interest at stake in the movement towards food sovereignty through agroecology – quite the contrary. It is to say; however, that given the unequal distribution of power in the food system (towards corporations) and how institutionalized racism, colonialism and oppression have built the food system (and society) as it is, these historically marginalized groups should be supported as they take leadership in guiding society in a different direction, and in particular when it comes to agriculture and food.

Without the centering of these groups in the current discussion, then there is no agroecology and no food sovereignty. This recognition is strategic, for it places the question of agroecology and food sovereignty at the intersections of race, class, gender, migration and, ultimately, land.

Looking ahead

This narrative of “Towards a Peoples’ Agroecology” is an initiative aimed at uplifting and amplifying those who are at the center of various forms of transformation within the food system, and are using the banners of agroecology and food sovereignty to carry their visions forward in a variety of ways. The project is not final nor is it a comprehensive tale, but a small glimpse into organizing efforts and visions from some of the groups that feel the greatest historical weight of the food system.

This project is one of the fruits coming out of a multi-year process involving various farmworker, African-American and Latino farming organizations across the US and in Puerto Rico. Some of the groups are members of La Via Campesina and others are close allies and partners. From February 16 – 20 of 2015, several of these groups participated in the 1st Campesino-a-Campesino Agroecology Encounter, in Fellsmere and Florida City, Florida. The encounter was co-organized by the Farmworkers Association of Florida (FWAF) and the Rural Coalition (RC) – both members of La Via Campesina North America.

collage for blain piece

As a result of this encounter, several of the groups decided to continue the learning process and deepen their political and social understanding of agroecology through a series of tele-conference meetings/discussion, study materials and presentations from key persons within peasant movements advancing agroecology and political education in Latin America. This process was called Formacion en Agroecologia, which in English means “Formation in Agroecology”. The groups in this process, which will be highlighted in this series are – The Farmworkers Association of Florida, Community-2-Community, Farmworker Support Committee (CATA), and Boricua - La Organizacion de Agriculture Ecologica de Puerto Rico.

This series will highlight some of the perspectives, visions and agroecological practices and processes of formation (training) within Farmworker communities and amongst farmers of color within the US and Puerto Rico.

As stated by La Via Campesina in their recent publication PEASANT AGROECOLOGY FOR FOOD SOVEREIGNTY AND MOTHER EARTH, “We believe that the origin of agroecology lies in the accumulated knowledge and knowhow of rural peoples, systematized by a dialogue between different types of knowledge (“diálogo de saberes”) in order to produce the “science”, the movement and the practice of agroecology” (La Via Campesina). OUR Hope, is that the visions, actions and perspectives amplified through this project will bring yet another critical perspective and voice to the current debate on agroecology, food sovereignty and our food system that is unfolding around the country. And that, these will add to the “dialogo de saberes” that is necessary in the US to truly and honestly confront the root causes of injustice, poverty, hunger and oppression in this society and the food system (Martinez and Rosset).

This media project is funded and supported by WhyHunger. Amongst other supporters, WhyHunger also supported and participated in the Agroecology Encounter in Florida, 2015.

 

WhyHunger’s What Ferguson Means for the Food Justice Movement series is a bold attempt to explore the way in which police violence and institutionalized anti-black racism is deeply interconnected to food, land and Black bodies. What is the connection between the death of Black people at the hands of the state (police shootings) and the death of Black people at the hands of the corporate food system (diet-related disease/land displacement/redlining)?

To lift up critical voices of the movement, WhyHunger’s Beatriz Beckford facilitated a national call with dynamic organizers and activists across the country to gather a collective interrogation of these issues from the perspective of Black activists organizing around food justice. Issue #4 features Charm Taylor, independent artist, activist and Co-Director of Community Outreach & Youth Internships at The Backyard Gardeners Network in New Orleans, LA, who discusses how activism and interdependent movement building can help marginalized people reclaim land and control over food.

Excerpt

Beatriz Beckford: What explicit connections can we make between gender, food justice and police violence?

Charm Taylor: What we see happening in Ferguson is a symptom of institutionalized American denial. That is to say, public housing policy as it stands is not the same thing as “40 acres and a mule.” Let’s face it, to be Black and poor in America means the state exercising control over your ability to acquire generational wealth and mobilize out of the “trap”; its “population containment” masking as public welfare. What if highly policed “low-income” and “subsidized housing” projects became “low risk, land subsidized” to cultivate land and return to communities with access to our cultural roots of farming? That’s liberation from such a grossly outdated paternalistic view of public welfare and true progress!

Download and continue reading the full issue. Also, join this important conversation online using hashtag #FoodJusticeVoices to share your thoughts!

WhyHunger’s latest Food Justice Voices publication “Cultivating International Solidarity Through Popular Resistance,” features Angela Adrar of the Rural Coalition and La Via Campesina who interviews social movement leaders from around the globe to get their perspectives on how international solidarity unites those with common struggles to build resistance and change the systems that have failed them. The topic of international solidarity is then explored in the context of two evolving and personal experiences that highlight the intersections of water, energy, land and food connecting international solidarity to concrete action in the U.S.

“Solidarity is an assertion that no people is alone, no people is isolated in the struggle for progress. Solidarity is the conscious alliance of the progressive and peace-loving revolutionary forces in the common struggle against colonialism, capitalism and imperialism. In short, against exploitation of man by man.” ― Samora Machel, Revolutionary Leader and first President of Mozambique

Excerpt:

For over 10 years, U.S. social movements have been strategically aggregating power working at regional, hemispheric and global levels to collectively change the system. These change-makers are redefining international solidarity and transforming it from one that is funded and shaped by NGOs and funders to one that is "of the people." The international struggle that is evolving is wrestling historical power structures that perpetuate racial, gender and income inequities while addressing local to global movement building obstacles within our own non-profit and philanthropic relationships.

Read and download the full publication to learn more about the social movements WhyHunger supports and why they’re important in the fight to achieve food and environmental justice.

WhyHunger’s What Ferguson Means for the Food Justice Movement series is a bold attempt to explore the way in which police violence and institutionalized anti-black racism is deeply interconnected to food, land and Black bodies. What is the connection between the death of Black people at the hands of the state (police shootings) and the death of Black people at the hands of the corporate food system (diet-related disease/land displacement/redlining)?

To lift up critical voices of the movement, WhyHunger’s Beatriz Beckford facilitated a national call with dynamic organizers and activists across the country to gather a collective interrogation of these issues from the perspective of Black activists organizing around food justice. Issue #3, released today as the culmination of our Black History Month content, features an introduction by Montague Simmons from the Organization for Black Struggle and farmer, activist and community organizer Amanda Walker who examines food justice through a racial justice lens and believes that the energy surrounding Ferguson can be channeled into community organizing and developing business cooperatives similar to that of HOSCO Farms to achieve sustainable change and economic growth.

Excerpt

Beatriz Beckford: What explicit connections can we make between food justice and police violence?

Amanda Walker: If we are to create an environment that values Black life we must first build up our capital and cannot ignore the role food plays in the economy. By building cooperative businesses that generate dollars we can recirculate dollars back into the community. But the truth is that without good land and good food we cannot be truly free. In communities of color where there are high poverty rates, the lack of opportunity for economic advancement provides a space for community ownership through food production to take root and grow into a network of co-member owners. This is a way to make sure dollars are put to use within the community.

Continue reading the full issue and join this important conversation online using hashtag #FoodJusticeVoices to share your thoughts!

WhyHunger’s What Ferguson Means for the Food Justice Movement series is a bold attempt to explore the way in which police violence and institutionalized anti-black racism is deeply interconnected to food, land and Black bodies. What is the connection between the death of Black people at the hands of the state (police shootings) and the death of Black people at the hands of the corporate food system (diet-related disease/land displacement/redlining)?

To lift up critical voices of the movement, WhyHunger’s Beatriz Beckford facilitated a national call with dynamic organizers and activists across the country to gather a collective interrogation of these issues from the perspective of Black activists organizing around food justice. Issue #2 featuring activist Dara Cooper focuses on the power of people organizing and the creation of sustainable, self-determining communities and introduces the National Black Food and Justice Alliance (NBFJA).

Excerpt

Beatriz Beckford: Can you speak to the importance of creating autonomous spaces that center Black leadership, Black struggle, and solutions to food sovereignty and land rights work?

Dara Cooper: An essential part of Black struggle is self-determination, including how our communities are able to feed and house ourselves. As it stands now, our communities are almost wholesale reliant on corporate and outside producers to feed us, house us and protect us—ultimately affecting our ability to be truly self-determining and liberated. As we defend ourselves against the incessant violence via the state and racist vigilantes, we also understand the violent attacks on our communities via the violence of hunger, land dispossession, blatant discrimination against Black farmers/growers, wage theft and exploitation and excessive saturation of junk food marketing in Black communities—all of which the state is also complicit in.

Black communities, however, have a long history of resilience, self-determination and deep historical roots in Black food security, production and culture. From farming, to developing systems of distribution, to shaping the culinary traditions of foodways nationwide, to production and a wide array of collective/ cooperative food businesses, Black communities have historically organized ourselves to address our needs where the system fails (and assaults) us. For these reasons and many more, we are organizing a network of Black-led organizations working towards advancing Black leadership, building Black self-determination, and organizing towards food sovereignty and justice. We are organizing the National Black Food and Justice Alliance (NBFJA).

Continue reading the full issue and join this important conversation using hashtag #FoodJusticeVoices.

youthzine cover

“We can’t talk to youth about farms if they are disconnected from the land, and how do we create better school food without the voices of youth who use the program each and every day.” Beatriz Beckford, Co-Director, Grassroots Action Network at WhyHunger

Beatriz is one of four social justice activists that have come together with eighteen young authors to support the creation of the new Youth Food Justice Zine. The zine, part of WhyHunger’s Food Justice Voices series, offers a platform for young food justice activists to share their stories, publish their creative work and express their views on the state of our nation’s food system. This compilation of drawings, poems, photos and short stories elevates the voices of youth food justice activists, as well as intergenerational narratives around youth power within the context of the United States.

Launched in conjunction with the national youth Rooted In Community 2015 Leadership Summit, taking place this week in Detroit, The Youth Food Justice Zine is full of vibrant color, captivating language and the voices of youth across the country. The editors, Miyuki Baker, Beatriz Beckford, Victoria Pozos Bernal, and Ayisah Yusuf, believe that while movements should be intergenerational, youth power and creativity in movements is crucial to collective liberation. The introduction to the zine explains, “Youth are the next leading generation and empowerment and encouragement to be in leadership positions are crucial if our struggle for food justice is to continue.”

The zine, compiled from the more than 60 creative works submitted by youth leaders across the country, offers definitions of food justice, perspectives on healthy eating, a guide to being an adult ally, contributor resources and more!  The Youth Food Justice Zine is a must read for anyone engaged in the food justice movement and can be found  here.

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youthzine_v1

 

Twitter: @YouthFJZine

Facebook: Youth Food Justice Zine

 

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