Connect Blog

This post first appeared in The Huffington Post.

“No problem can be solved on the same level of consciousness that created it.” - Albert Einstein

Our current governmental situation is unlike any we have faced as a nation throughout our history. It is not a problem of liberal against conservative, Republican against Democrat, red against blue, white against color or cities against rural and suburbs, although it has all of those elements.

It is a problem of power, whether power means dominance or service, narcissism that says “only I can do it, only I can save you” or the power of humility that says we are stronger together and we all have something to contribute.

It is a problem of truthfulness, whether words and real facts actually matter, actually mean something rather than emerging and then disappearing into some alternate pseudo reality.

It is a problem of reality itself, what is real as opposed to what is merely framed as real. How can real problems be identified and then solved when they are clouded by a series of lies, false denials and twisted statements that are tossed into a narrative that purports to be truthful, and may contain fragments of truth, but is fraudulent?

It is a problem of fear, fear of the illusion of national carnage, that it might creep into my neighborhood, harm my children and threaten my home. Fear of the “other” who look or pray or dress differently. It is a fear that can paralyze people who would normally know better but who vote for and support politicians who do not have their best interests at heart and, in fact, pass laws and promote policies that harm these same voters.

It is the problem of promises of better health care for all when there is no real plan, only a series of cuts that will throw millions of people off Medicaid, promising to leave successful programs like Social Security and Medicare alone while allies have their own plans to severely cut the same programs and many more that serve millions of poor and middle class citizens.

It is a problem of the emerging of the old “America First” isolationist mentality that shut the doors to millions of European Jews for more than ten years during the Holocaust when open doors could have saved many lives. It is a policy that goes against the best in our tradition of international involvement in world affairs and locks the doors of entry for millions of those who are peaceful seekers of the American Dream but who may look or speak or pray differently.

It is a problem for millions of folks who have lived in America for years, worked hard and paid taxes and will now face possible deportation which in many cases will divide parents from their children.

It is a problem for millions of farm workers who pick our fruits and vegetables, for farmers who depend on them and for all of us who depend on their labor.

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Just in time for International Women’s Day, WhyHunger is excited to release our newest publication “Through Her Eyes: The Struggle for Food Sovereignty.” International Women’s Day is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. We know that women are responsible for 60-80% of food production in the Global South and represent 50% of food chain workers in the U.S. Yet, women and girls are disproportionally affected by hunger. And for us, it is very important to recognize and honor the women around the world who are fighting for food sovereignty and creating just, sustainable...
As part of WhyHunger’s celebration of Black History Month in the United States, we’ve shared stories of just a few of the important contributions Black Americans have made to our food and agriculture systems and the struggle for food justice. There is so much to celebrate; it could not possibly be contained in one month or year. I’d like to take this moment, in honor of Black History Month, to offer my own reflection and share my perspective. I believe, as is reflected in WhyHunger’s Theory of Change, that we cannot work on the issues of hunger and poverty without working...
To culminate Black History Month we interviewed mother, farmer, activist and scholar-in-training Shakara Tyler and asked her to share her thoughts on the impacts and work that Black people have contributed to our food system. As we continue to fight hunger and poverty, it’s important to recognize the multiple intersections with other struggles within the food justice movement and embrace solutions developed by grassroots leadership. Hope you enjoy and learn something new! For Black History Month, we want to share important contributions that African Americans have made to our food system/agriculture…what is one of your favorite historical facts or someone whose...
Sneak peek! This is an excerpt from our upcoming publication “Through Her Eyes: The Struggle for Food Sovereignty.” This story featuring Magha Garcia, Organización Boricuá de Agricultura Ecológica and Anne Frederick,Hawai’i Alliance for Progressive Action(HAPA, is one of many that lift up the voices of women (farmers, farmworkers, food chain workers, etc.) fighting for food sovereignty around the world. Enjoy and look out for the new publication when it is released on March 1st! Magha Garcia is an eco-farmer and environmental activist in Puerto Rico. She is a member of Organización Boricuá de Agricultura Ecológica , a grassroots group of farmers and...
After 42 years of working in the U.S. and around the world to end hunger and build social justice for all, we know firsthand that the just, plentiful world we are working to build has no room for oppressive or discriminatory rhetoric, threats or actions. With federal policies and practices...

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Interested in what we do? WhyHunger is working to build and strengthen a grassroots-led movement for food justice and food sovereignty worldwide. We are happy to share a recap of our 2016 impacts ranging from supporting social movements, strengthening social justice efforts and protecting the right to nutritious food, while...

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This spotlight is a feature of WhyHunger’s digital storytelling that showcases grassroots organizations and community leaders through dynamic stories and pictures, to give a real view of projects that are working to alleviate food insecurity and increase communities’ access to nutritious food. We believe that telling one’s story is not...

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WhyHunger sat down with longtime supporter and author Rich Garon to get some insight on his new novel Felling Big Trees, his commitment to address the root causes of hunger and what his career in politics has taught him about social issues. Proceeds from Felling Big Trees benefit WhyHunger. Q: Of...

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Originally published on http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ I went on the March on Washington in 1963. It changed my life forever. I became a small part of the Civil Rights Movement, marched with Doctor Martin Luther King several times and have spent my life trying to fight hunger and poverty afflicting all people, but especially...

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Welcome to WhyHunger’s Connect Blog featuring stories, projects and articles from the community-based organizations, organizers and social movements that are building the movement for food justice.

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