Connect Blog

WhyHunger is pleased to be partnering with Andrianna Natsoulas, long-time food sovereignty activist and author of the forthcoming book Food Voices: Stories of the Food Sovereignty Movement. For the past year, Andrianna has been on a journey across the Americas to capture the stories of people working towards and living a just and sustainable food system. Below is the latest highlight of her work.

Julio Cesar Moreno is a fisherman from Chuao in the state of Aragua in Venezuela. For the past 21 years he has been fishing for a variety of fish on his boat, El Una. Julio is active with the National Organization of Artisanal Fishermen and Fisherwomen and is the Latin American Spokesperson for Artisanal Fishermen of the Social Front. Through these organizations, he has helped reshape the fishing law of Venezuela.

"The resource that we have is a finite resource and it has been overexploited in the past. We, the fishermen, as well as the government, want to make sure the next generation is able to use these resources. We have felt the impacts of pollution and climate change, which is causing there to be less fish. But, here, the Caribbean is feeling these impacts less than in other areas. Up until when are we going to be able to resist these broader environmental impacts? We, the artisanal fishermen, together with the progressive governments have to make sure that we do our part to maintain this resource as clean and healthy as possible. And to always be able to enjoy a good plate of fish.

"The Law of Fishing and Aquaculture protects us. The important element of it is the collective, not the individual. Through this law, we are trying to make it so that what comes from the fishermen goes directly to the people, so people can eat fish very economically. In our fishing law, we have an article that eliminates industrial trawling1 in all of the continental plate around Venezuela. This is the only country that has, by law, eliminated industrial trawling. With industrial trawling, only six percent of their catch would be sold. The rest would be dumped back as waste. Trawling does not give the little fish the opportunity to grow into big fish and reach sexual maturity. It disrupts the environmental equilibrium in the marine ecosystems. This fishing law that we have protects the fisherfolk and the fish. The law was originally passed in 2002. From 2008-2009 was the phasing out of the trawlers. On the 31st of March 2009, it went into effect that the trawlers were completely eliminated. As a result, the national artisanal fish catch has increased by 8 percent.

"We only capture the large fish of good value for markets. All the smaller fish we release so they can grow. This law is also about all the fisherfolk being able to have dignified lives, to be able to have dignified homes, dignified jobs, decent boats. To be able to access an education. Once we retire, to be able to have a good pension, too. These are some of the achievements of the revolution that we fishfolk have helped to bring about."

 

1 Industrial trawling is a form of fishing that uses giant nets pulled behind a ship to sweep up everything in its path.

I was recently in the Bay Area, and had the opportunity to visit Mandela MarketPlace, a 2009 recipient of the competitive USDA Community Food Project grant. I was especially excited to meet folks at Mandela because we have selected them to be part of the pilot year of the WhyHunger/Growing Power Community Learning Project for Food Justice. We will be working with them closely in the next year, facilitating shared learning with their partner groups in LA and Chicago. Mandela MarketPlace is addressing the food access issues and health disparities of its West Oakland community in innovative and community-led ways. The...
After driving several miles down a dusty road through the Sonoran desert — the stunning and snow-capped Babaquivari mountain range framing the horizon, the sacred Saguaro cacti and mesquite trees dotting an otherwise dry and scrappy landscape — we pull up to a small oasis of green. There in the middle of a pea field (a traditional variety – though nobody remembers if it’s indigenous or brought over by the Spanish) is a coyote grazing on the new shoots. He barely acknowledges us as we stumble out of the rented Buick (aka “the boat”) with our cameras hoping to capture...
After driving several miles down a dusty road through the Sonoran desert — the stunning and snow-capped Babaquivari mountain range framing the horizon, the sacred Saguaro cacti and mesquite trees dotting an otherwise dry and scrappy landscape — we pull up to a small oasis of green. There in the middle of a pea field (a traditional variety – though nobody remembers if it’s indigenous or brought over by the Spanish) is a coyote grazing on the new shoots. He barely acknowledges us as we stumble out of the rented Buick (aka “the boat”) with our cameras hoping to capture...

WhyHunger visits the Tohono O'odham Nation

BROOKE SMITH , MARCH 7, 2011 tagged as HCSRA
...
Page 62 of 62

About

Welcome to WhyHunger’s Connect Blog featuring stories, projects and articles from the community-based organizations, organizers and social movements that are building the movement for food justice.

Sign Up

Stay in the know with the most up-to-date information about our work and initiatives by signing up for WhyHunger’s monthly newsletters

Enter your email below to receive a bi-weekly blog recap in your inbox.



Subscribe to our RSS Feed

Powered by FeedBurner