Recent Publications

Food Access Problems need Food Justice Solutions

Canadians have a right to food – sort of. In accordance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which the Canadian government ratified in 1976, everyone living in this country has a right to food. That makes the government the duty bearer in ensuring that people can feed themselves, their families and their communities.
This does not mean that the government is required to give out free food. Rather, the government is obliged to create the conditions for people to be able to access good, nutritious, affordable food with dignity, now and in the future.
Successive governing parties, however, have failed to meet these obligations.
Learn what steps FoodShare Toronto took towards food and social justice and its impact.

Canadians have a right to food – sort of. In accordance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which the Canadian government ratified in 1976, everyone living in this country has a right to food. That makes the government the duty bearer in ensuring that people can feed themselves, their families and their communities. This does not
Before Hurricanes Irma and Maria struck in 2017, a large percentage of Puerto Ricans faced food insecurity on a daily basis. In fact, Puerto Ricans were 4 times more likely to be hungry than the average American. In a region with rich soil, a temperate climate and a rich agricultural history, these figures become even starker when set against the
neighbors together food justice
View our online interactive web page Thirty-five years ago, the community of central Brooklyn saw a steep decline in quality of life for its residents. Lack of jobs, a cut to social resources, and a swell of drugs hit the area -and fast. Residents began to see their neighborhood changing rapidly, and those who wanted to see their community thrive
In new Food Justice Voices issue Pathology of Displacement: The Intersection of Food Justice and Culture, storyteller, healing practitioner and food justice organizer Shane Bernardo tells his story about how displacement has affected his ancestors and family within the Philippine diaspora, and how he is working to reclaim ancestral subsistence practices that connect him to land, food and his roots. In this