Recent Publications

Food Access Problems need Food Justice Solutions

Canadians have a right to food – sort of. In accordance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which the Canadian government ratified in 1976, everyone living in this country has a right to food. That makes the government the duty bearer in ensuring that people can feed themselves, their families and their communities.
This does not mean that the government is required to give out free food. Rather, the government is obliged to create the conditions for people to be able to access good, nutritious, affordable food with dignity, now and in the future.
Successive governing parties, however, have failed to meet these obligations.
Learn what steps FoodShare Toronto took towards food and social justice and its impact.

Food Access Problems need Food Justice Solutions
Canadians have a right to food – sort of. In accordance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which the Canadian government ratified in 1976, everyone living in this country has a right to food. That makes the government the duty bearer in ensuring that people can Read more.
Solidarity, Education and Action! Comedores Sociales: An emerging movement in Puerto Rico
Before Hurricanes Irma and Maria struck in 2017, a large percentage of Puerto Ricans faced food insecurity on a daily basis. In fact, Puerto Ricans were 4 times more likely to be hungry than the average American. In a region with rich soil, a temperate climate and a rich agricultural Read more.
L’agroécologie
L’agroécologie permet aux communautés de définir eux-mêmes leurs propres solutions pour produire des aliments sains et conserver les eaux et les sols.   Read more.
Agroecology
WhyHunger is proud to release its first agroecology publication, “Agroecology: Putting Food Sovereignty into Action.” Agroecology is an agricultural method… Read more.